Contrast the usefulness of absolute and relative dating techniques

Despite this, the "principle of cross cutting relationships" can be used to determine the sequence of deposition, folds, and faults based on their intersections -- if folds and faults deform or cut across the sedimentary layers and surfaces, then they obviously came after deposition of the sediments.

You can't deform a structure (e.g., bedding) that is not there yet!

Fundamental to stratigraphy are a set of simple principles, based on elementary geometry, empirical observation of the way these rocks are deposited today, and gravity.This document is partly based on a prior posting composed in reply to Ted Holden.My thanks to both him and other critics for motivating me.These are often characterised as the norm, rather than the exception.I thought it would be useful to present an example where the geology is simple, and unsurprisingly, the method does work well, to show the quality of data that would have to be invalidated before a major revision of the geologic time scale could be accepted by conventional scientists.They are the "initial working hypotheses" to be tested further by data.Using these principles, it is possible to construct an interpretation of the sequence of events for any geological situation, even on other planets (e.g., a crater impact can cut into an older, pre-existing surface, or craters may overlap, revealing their relative ages).They are applied by geologists in the same sense that a "null hypothesis" is in statistics -- not necessarily correct, just testable.In the last 200 or more years of their application, they are valid, but geologists do not assume they are.There are situations where it potentially fails -- for example, in cave deposits.In this situation, the cave contents are younger than both the bedrock below the cave and the suspended roof above.

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